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CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:15am EST
discusses his book "syria: the fall of the house of assad". >> thank youpa so much fors spending part of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very impo
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 6:00am EDT
thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but the journalists would say
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the authority i
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 6:00am EST
syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish priorities you have to begin with an analysis of what the problem is. now, the way the issue of s
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 8:00pm EST
happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outside scholars and practition
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. what impact did that have on iran for political solutions? the current policy that we have in syria, where we seem to be attempting to limit the regional influence on the air world, are we doing the right thing when i'm not -- are we doing too much. i cannot end without mentioning the palestinian question. more often i hear the argument that the argument is dead and that is a shame. because if we are going to negotiate with iran, it might be intelligent to do more than just talk about the nuclear issue. it might be better to talk about the full range of issues that are between us. at one point in time, iran indicated that willingness to talk about this and interest in doing their best. i think it makes in that region on all of these of concern concerns. we have a number of studies that are looking at the costs and benefits. the costs are very significant. i would like to mention one study that i think is something that hasn't been done in other studies. that is a study by trita parsi that details the human casualties in war from the toxic chemical fumes and the radioactivity. on bot
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
professors from duke and georgia russian to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 6:00am EST
success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the iranians try to forget the shooting down in th
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
expand that out on yemen or syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant cases funding and model was hard to do. people like to fight the eastern european case because it was successful. the problem there is there wasn't a nato membership in the e.u. but helped to really drive that political role and meet the commitment of the government to undertake the reform. certainly for a country like tunisia. what they're looking at interestingly enough are the cases of south korea, taiwan and south africa as examples of places that have undergone a similar authoritarian transitions to the space rule, particular emphasis on the police and internal capability. >> i'm very glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact pulled out some opportunities from learning because if we hadn't integrated that possibility into the way this group responded to the question i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it causes a great deal about the limited validity of w
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 9:00am EDT
russians have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could have been done, pretty much nothing was done except to make the situation worse. all of the talk in the united nations, and elsewhere, and the talk of a cease-fire, these are not solutions. this is talk. it's too late. it's too unclear. it's too fractious. how many in this room could name the opposition? how many in this room have a clear view of who the opposition is? or will be? on a danger to the united states, to the gcc and others? do we know this? are we going to hand weapons to them? i remember a reporter from "the wall street journal" asking me as the revolution was going on in libya, whose the
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 11:00pm EST
about this? you look what they did and the syria war, in which was they had in 2006, you never heard word one about it before they did it. why are they vocal about this? there's three reasons why they have been so vocal. one, it was designed to motivate the rest of the world, and i think, by the way, if you, you know, we know from our emphasis regarding the idea that the europeans would have adopted the sanctions they did like a boycott on iranian oil if they didn't they the alternative was they would strike voluntarily, and to think that would have happened without the israeli, quote, motivation," is not realistic. the second reason they do it is because they are getting the world ready not to be surprised. if diplomacy fails, and the third reason is to get the public ready. that reflecting their reality, but in answer to the question, we've, you know, you've -- we've not had conversations with others that i'm aware of that would deal with that, but i note for you that david cameron made statements saying, you know, also repeated the words "all options on the table," we want deploam
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30pm EST
situation in syria. in a little more than two hours, sent a leader harry reid on the filibuster. after that, we will re-air the comments of chief justice roberts at rice university. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", gas prices and alternative energy efforts. long-term unemployment benefits and why they may end in january without congressional action is discussed. after that, dominic chu describes what wall street investors are doing with their money in excess of the fiscal cliff. close plus your e-mails and phone calls and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights, watch key public policy events, and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules on the website and join in the the conversation on social media sites. >> representatives met in nova scotia earlier this month before the house. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. i wo
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:40pm EST
doesn't want the entire american south to be a teaming -- something like syria. that's not the goal that the confederates are after. they want to control the territory the way a proper nation state government can. and there are variety of reasons for that. social, cultural, slavery, a form of property that requires a basic level of social stability. as you see in the civil war, because slaves are property in this regime but the reality is they're always human beings and people and they can run away and do things of evading restriction in a way that physical property normally can't. so, the confederacy is always going to be unable really to really reliablily on guerrillas as the main effort because the point of that is to have an environment of social chaos. you also have -- i use this anecdote at the beginning of the book. the officers of the regular army have a lot of experience at irregular warfare. they haven't it from fighting indians. part of the cop sequence of the experience, people like lee have to chase indians in texas -- they actually have a powerful distaste for it. it's
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
killed by terrorists in syria -- arab spring is turned stormy. the united states and hundreds of millions of dollars in federal aid to countries around the world to democracies and dictators. what should be the basis and the guiding principles for american foreign policy? berg: fundamentally i would have to say it's something we need to encourage across the world but let me talk about christopher stephenson what happened there. .. heitkamp: i think our guiding principle are to be what is in the best interest for america first? if you take a look at egypt, under the original plan, we gave tremendous amounts of foreign aid to the state of egypt. egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars that we are sending to egypt. we have to say that these dollars are for maintaining a security and peace and if you are not participating, you do not get these dollars. that is job one. we have to continue our commitment of foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally and our sister country come and we need to do
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30am EST
the best approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried abou
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
to stick on a foreign policy issue and start with mr. moss. there's a civil war in syria should the united states be doing more to help the opposition to the syrian government. moss: no. the peace and prosperity candidate. and peace is peace on earth not just in the lower fifty or 48. and i am opposed to war because it creates more problems than it solves. and thin things can be said more peacefully as one example going back to the nuclear menace that the f-35 represents. if i am elected, i will create a new federal department by merging two existing ones namely it would be called the department of social and national security. the social being the [inaudible] and then that's fully funded. the rest goes to the national security. i'm not afraid of them attacking ugh us. [laughter] >> moderator: mr. sanders. syria. sanders: i think most vice president people know despite what you may have heard. i only not voted against the war in iraqi voted against the gulf war and after two wars, which have cost over 6,000 soldiers will end up costing over $3 trillion added to our national debt. no
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 8:30am EST
. there's a civil war in syria. should the united states be doing more to help the opposition to the syria government? >> no, i'm the peace and prosperity candidate, and peace is peace on earth, not just in the lower 50 or 48, and i am opposed to war because it creates more problems than it solves, and things can be settled peacefully. there's one example going back to the nuclear menace that the f-35 represents. if i'm elected, i would create a new federal department by merging two existing ones, namely, it would be called the department of social and national security. social being the partners, and then that's fully funded. the rest goes to the national security. i'm not afraid of attacks us. >> moderator: mr. sanders, syria? sanders: i not only voted against the war in iraq, but the ethics voted against the gulf war, and after two wars, 6,000 soldiers, costs us over $3 trillion added to our national debt. no, i do not think that we should be involved in the caring of syria. assad killed tens of thousands of his own people. it's appropriate that we arm the rebels, but do it in a very ca
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
, and another on the situation in syria. >> one of the major effects on hurricane sandy was on telecommunications. that is our topic today on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is our guest today. mr. christopher guttman-mccabe, overall, what was the effect of hurricane sandy on your organization, verizon, sprint, at&t and etc. >> guest: thank you. i wouldn't mind taking a step back and providing a little perspective on this storm and the impact it had. mayor bloomberg said that the damage was unprecedented. but it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced. and the previous title search, it was 14 feet. governor chris christie said the damage was unthinkable. we have buyers. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding and if you look at that in the flooding of the subway system and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start to get the scale and scope of this form. and yet, the networks perform. i have read dozens of stories over the last couple of weeks about how the many consumers, they are only tied to any sort of information through their
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
inher years past. a lower priority today than the obvious higher priorities. iran, middle east, syria, north korea, china, and russia and so forth. i would imagine a considerably lower priority. eac n >> didew cuba policy wax and wae with each new administration? >> it did. the most fee roshes opposition was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy was really determined to cosomething about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. humiliated by castro at the bay of of pigs. was lyndon johnson came after kennedy, and his obsession was vietnam.pitously cuba. declined.r, subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made serious efforts to acheech a, response with castro. quite the opposite what kennedy was doing.y comby has waxed and waned. it's been a different kind of priority over the fifty years e for ten or eleven american g presidents. >> onet theerer reverse side. it did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president. >> i continue think that -- don't think that castro had a ai directns demand the assassinatin de plotri against th
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 8:00pm EST
terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just about every type of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from the old fashioned spy network, but transcripts from interrogation, logs of surveillance, monitoring, ce llphones and computers and the images and sensory readings hovering high and silent over potential targets for days or months or years. few of them are clearly related and they would previously remade headed a bank account s
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 6:00am EST
dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they are working on syria. you could point to example in bahrain, for example, not moving as fast. but is pretty difficult to flip the switch and light change every country in a matter of days. part of the obama philosophy, which is very interesting is trying to find what is pragmatically possible in this area that does not get america can't in the trap of unnecessary war, and quite my. so you these two examples of each ability which are most striking. here you have in egypt, you know, people on the streets clearly in opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, was senior, a wink and a nod trying to crack down team and. bush junior, a wink and a nod to crack down there. around the '50s of course, lots of examples where we tell folks, bush senior in iraq killing saddam if you want to crack down on the sheet, so be it, will not get involved. that's the typical which can do. for bush to go to my work and say you do get political governor, you don't get the crackdown. you are not going to keep your mo
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
syria. it is pretty difficult as flip a switch and change every country within a matter of days. part of the obama philosophy, which is interesting, it is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in traps of unnecessary wars, replication of imperialism, and quagmire. so you have these two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. and here you have people on the streets, clearly in opposition to the dictator there. for example, tiananmen square, bush junior and a crackdown there. around the 50s, of course, lots of examples where we tell folks and we say if you want to crack down on us, that is the typical way it is going down. for president bush to go to hosni mubarak and say you can't stand aside, you're not going to keep this if you do it that way. because of that factor, one of the key factors are gotten pushed out, libya was a different story where he had a possibility of a massacre during an obama said, well, i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can get a true international coalition through the u.n., then i
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
engaged right now but the coverage of what's happening in syria isn't bad but i don't know that it showed a great deal of light, and part of the problem is even though he were asking about -- i know you began by asking about what is happening, and what i think of the coverage of that today. any time israel is involved in the story it becomes an increase do it excruciatingly difficult story for american journalists to cover because there is for the most part a natural sympathy in this country. a sense of identity in this country and many reporters both friends and colleagues of mine, the late peter jennings used to road defeat to write and be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view not so much that he had spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic point of view to arabs. i fink what is happening in gaza means almost any definition of tragedy. they cannot be expected on the one hand to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the great irony of the paradox of that story is because the israeli defense forces are infinitely more prof
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
planet which is not about syria. it's not about pakistan. that sailing ship is the naval action of the biggest battle on this planet. paul the vulture singer, and romney are co romney has a piece of it. a small piece but you know a couple hundred million. a small piece. these vultures have attacked the nation of argentina saying that all the money that argentina once owned many years ago, new york banks -- do we care about the story oh argentine bank. argentine defaulted. no they didn't. they said we are not paying you a serious raid and if they did well and they did because they were not being killed, we will give you peace of argentina. they have citibank in jpmorgan and we have stock in argentina which was doing very well and then call the vulture singer swooped down and said that's fine just like he did with delphi and the auto parts. i have got you by the parts in detroit and now i have you in argentina. he doesn't want to just bring the argentine economy to its knees. he wants to bring united bank of switzerland, citibank, jpmorgan. a bank of america, he said all the money they h
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 5:00pm EST
new government, that international community for the first time units us, unlike in syria so we don't have the divisions we're facing in syria so we have unifieded the international community as that supports the political settlements so i think this opportunity should be used. so far, there are settlements to face, but i think we should have hope, faith, and i think the political settlement, this provides a grant for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. >> i'd like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on the dreary day, especially for a holiday for many of you, and thanks to ibrahim as well for staying up late and giving us those great insights. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president obama was re-elected, and the obama administration had a number of, i think, foreign policy and counterterrorism successes in the first administration. obviously, bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama oversaw the drawdown of troops in iran as well as afghanistan and, yet, i think the lasting legacy fro
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 8:00pm EST
remembered that anthony shadid died in syria while covering syria for "the washington post." his wife will be here representing him and that is not a lottery. katherine boo has been nominated in the nonfiction category, behind a beautiful forevers about a slum in mumbai india and finally anne applebaum has been nominated for iron curtain. that book is just out and she is scheduled to appear under q&a and show in december, so you will be able to see her as well and robert caro will be interviewing those others as we go and we will be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their pictures taken that right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation and this is david steinberger. david steinberger is the head of the perseus book group. if you would, tell us for those who don't know what is the national book award? >> the national book awards are given to the best marketing books in four categories every year so fiction, nonfiction, poetry and literature. it's the pantheon, the greatest american authors, saul bellow, john updike so it's a pretty good bi
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 9:00am EST
of the blocking that russia and china has taken against syria have that actually contribute any money to the humanitarian crisis that now exist in syria? >> i think occupation from russia and china have been very small. i will have to write to the honorable lady with details about the. they are not so large that have been committed in my mind, let us put it that way. we will encourage, i have encouraged before russia to make a contribution to those u.n. funds, but the biggest contribution, the biggest occupation comes from the states emphatically from the european union, third from the united kingdom. and, of course, we are also contributing the european union money. so the backing for these things is very heavily western as things stand. >> i know the foreign secretary said he didn't want to debate about the portion it or proportion. but while he is right to condemn militant rocket attacks would not also condemn the loss of innocent lives, particularly children? and with respect to both the u.n., is he out to be convinced that by taking the stance of the u.n. come uk government is to
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 9:00am EST
drivers, although not an age when but one that is critical has been weapons coming into syria, including from russia. even this week the turks forced a plane to land. it was crossing in their airspace. allegedly carrying weapons for assad's government. how has the president we set with russia increased american influence in moscow? so that one would think the president could convince the russians to act differently. and then i would ask you, dov, to respond or to explain how governor romney in his approach to america's leadership in the world plate carefully so that america might have more influence in stopping the killing in syria? >> so, the reset with russia was simply taking a very clear guide approach and recognizing that you're going to have inches that you can cooperate on an interests were you see things very different way. in areas like arms control, reducing the nuclear danger, nuclear proliferation and, of course, want to cooperate with russia. in areas where the agreed to allow supplies to come through russian territory to support our troops in afghanistan, of cour
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
, the conflict would probably be spreading to syria, creating one large issue. withdrawing from the western part of afghanistan. it would be disruptive of the security of oil flowing through the strait of hormuz. and there is a further uncertainty involved in that kind of an operation common namely how successful would be, in fact. and estimates regarding israel's potential to be decisively effective and estimates depend on the scale of the american attack. even a relatively modest attack by the united states would inflict serious casualties when the ratings for this for precipitation of the spirit are still unknown factors of what happens. there will be a significant factor of human casualties, particularly in places that are larger than some facilities, that have been destroyed or relocated. all of that makes an attack not a very attractive remedy for dealing with the problem. a problem which then would pale with significance compared to the consequences of the attack once the dynamic concept was set in motion. so i dismiss that serious alternative. i think it would be an act of u
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 1:00am EST
like in syria fighting fun government or they might be fighting a foreign occupation. in that respect, they are not representing an internationally recognized state but they are recognizing some kind of nation state or potential state. you could have conventional soldiers and these were the tactics may be operating out of uniform outside of the logistics training of conventional military using guerrilla tactics and booby traps and things like that. and for american citizens though are the projections different were stronger? >> okay so i would argue that in terms of human rights, people have the same set of human rights which include rights against arbitrary detention, rights against the abuse and to retain privacy and refuse personal questions asked by strangers. what i do think is different is the power of government different groups of people, so if you are a law enforcement agency you have more liberty to act in certain ways against citizens of your own country versus foreign citizens because there's a justification for the police to interrogate near you if they suspect you of wro
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 7:00am EST
in the not-too-distant future. >> thousands of people are being killed in syria each month and the suffering of people is immense. sources within the countries a british assistance has been slow and the priority would be supporting the civil administration counsel so the basic water and syrian services can be connected. want more and the prime minister to to discuss with president obama to really bring about a solution to this crisis? >> i know that the prime minister who of course is in the region right now discusses this on an ongoing basis with the president of the united states, and will continue to do so. where the second largest natural don't in syria. of course, the circumstances on the ground are incredibly different -- difficult, but we need to make every other weekend to celebrate that, get to the people in a timely manner in the right place but any suggestions what we need to make to the department for international development and others about how we should do that, of course, will be -- >> official documents show the healthiest quote best option is downgrading general
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
there are various conflicts going on around the world, in syria we have seen 40,000 killed, i don't know how many, 100,000, 200,000, who have been wounded, many of them innocent women and children because of the ferocity and barbaric conduct of this conflict. i don't know how many people today in china are subject to infanticide because there is not a birth certificate available and we know that that practice not only in china but in other parts of the world, a lot of it in asia, go on. we live in a very troubled and tush leapt world. not only -- turbulent world. not only the normal situation, there are people who are born with disabilities from time to time. i have had the honor of knowing children as all of us have, and there are no more loving and caring people in our world than children and disabilities who have disabilities. but there is going to be a lot more because of the conflicts that are going on in various places in the world. they might deserve our special attention because they are living in countries that will have a lot less of the rule of law, a lot less ability to
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
the old normal. when i looked at what's going on currently in syria, for example, i am i reminded in a really worrisome way of what happened almost two decades ago in boss bosnia. are we capable of learning for those type of experiences? are we allowing a situation to deter youruate further and further a religion bore that will create more and more hatred and inability of the country to come together again? i am worried that we are not capable. we seem to be not capable at this moment to use the kind of zip sei -- diplomacy i think would be highly desirable top find buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countri
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
, folks in syria and homs, they show what they could, to folks here in oakland with camera phones trying to show police misbehaving. somebody, the act of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professionals -- what you think? we do not have a conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights, if you are committing journalism you should be protected? how you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. is a great question. something journalists and tijuana struggle with all the time with the rise of social media and websites a lot of you have heard about -- including one which started out as a compendium of information about basically narco turf wars, shootings in the streets, the headings. it started off as a visual wallpaper and has since become interesting, more sophisticated, and is beginning to write articles and put -- and the editor is anonymous, but they are beginning to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being a kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turni
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 5:00pm EST
that out in places like syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant differences and so finding a model that works is like people like to cite the eastern european case because it was unsuccessful. the problem there is consensus in the membership but help to drive that political will and raise the commitment of the government to undertake reforms. there isn't something parallel to that for the country like to tunisia. but they are looking as the cases of south korea and south africa and chile as examples of places that have undergone similar offer rotarian positions to a space rule which has given an emphasis on the internal to devotee. >> you know, i'm jury glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact hold some opportunities for learning because we have not integrated that possibility into the way in which we responded to the question. i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it tells a great deal about the limited validity of what we
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 8:00pm EST
syria. if you see a big argument about whether or not the united states needs to be centrally involved in issues in which its interests may not be completely vital and that's a big change for the world. that may be the new normal. >> every list i forgot something. halifax is nothing if not cutting-edge. you are all encouraged to tweet or have your aides tweaked whatever insights you may find. the hash tag is halifax 2012 and we are going to have a force multiplier and social media realm about the brilliant insights that are here. you'll be the first one has actually treated. >> seen from europe the new normal that i can see doesn't look so dramatically different from the old normal. it has become popular in europe to speak of the decline of america to name just one example. spiegel had a cover story about the six superpower. in terms of the matter is, i don't think there's going to be a decline. the united states would be the one superpower for a long time to come. yet there've issue we get excited about and some people on the side of the atlantic is the future of europe and t
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 8:30am EST
relationship in the sense that things will go off the tracks with regard to either iran or syria, or now with israel's problems on the gaza and so on, i think that both sides will be careful to try to work as well together as they can, but they don't look at things exactly the same way. and it will matter i think, at least to the united states if we find things we think should get done at the united nations or in other ways are being stymied by china. i'm not predicting that what i would at least put a star next to that as a possibility. north korea, i think we're going to see some renewed efforts over the next several months to see if there's a path forward with north korea. i don't see the obama administration changing the terms of engagement. and our ambassador in seoul just reiterate the fact that we won't. but we'll also the new government in seoul, which i think no matter who wins, will be looking towards at least some more engagement. and that could indeed complicate things and involve both the u.s. and china, and i think we have to pay attention. finally, on these issues, i t
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
context. afghanistan, the arab spring, syria versus the liberalizing countries. what are the biggest challenges to u.s. foreign policy from all this innovation and new technology? >> well, you've mentioned, i think, a number of the biggest challenges. one of the ways that i think we benefit from thinking about this is to distinguish between long-term goals and near-term management challenges. >> uh-huh. >> so let's start with the easier one, right? long-term goals, we have to bet on openness, freedom, universal access to private markets for the reasons i talked about in my remarks and many others, the recipe for global peace and prosperity is in that long-term vision. there's no question there are short-term challenges that are very real. greater connectivity, broadband deployment over time will lead to greater economic opportunity and job creation. in the near term, there's potentially a mismatch between connectivity giving dangerous people larger platform and forum without losing economic opportunity as quickly. when we think about that, we have many difficult management ch
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 9:00am EST
should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more in syria, that we should do something militarily and iran was continually pushed away from that by the more political politically minded wing of his party that was reading an internal polling which said, there's not much difference particularly on afghanistan it when republicans and democrats. so you don't have the demand side, if you will for the kind of military spending that we've seen over the last decade. you know longer have a public outcry for military spending on this scale as a response to terrorism either. the second point related to that which is a bit of a two-edged sword is that the public believes and the league also that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem. and, of course, the most obvious exponent of this is a drones and other remote-controlled warfare that instead of invading a country, you can just, the public perceives in many elites also proceed, station drones along its border. there's no faxing strategic conversation about whether that is, in fact, correct and w
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 6:00am EST
into iraq through syria and the possession of this database, 500 individuals who blow themselves up or arrange for a terrorist attack was critical in the effort to take out qaeda in mesopotamia apart. the mother lode of documents seized from what has become know as the singe our raid illustrates the point nicely. the point being the one made by lieutenant general lewis or flame. in the six years after the 9/11 attacks, the u.s. military representing a wide variety of agencies, large and small, and those victorious in the secret had been collaborating on an unprecedented capability for crushing terrorist networks. in addition to skills of talented special operators the effort uses supercomputers and custom software, skilled analysts the ability to turn every kind of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from old spy networks, transcripts, lots of electronic surveillance, monitoring coming communication between cell phones and computers are the images and sensor readings gathered by jones hovering high and silent over potential targets for days, weeks, months or years.
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
ambassador to libya was recently killed by terrorists. syria has descend understood civil war and the arab spring has turned stormy. the united states sends hundreds of millions of dollars in federal aid to countries around the world, to democracies and dictators. what should be the basic guiding principles of american foreign policy? berg: fundamentally i have to say that freedom is something we need to encourage across the world but let me talk about christopher stevens and what happened there. his death along with three others is a tragedy. i know that has been in a lot of people's thoughts and prayers. we need to get to the bottom of that. and i'm not here to speculate who did what but we need to find out. the american people need to know. as the thing unfolds i hope it can be transparent and clear. two things will come out of that. number one, if there are people that made mistakes and need to be held accountable we can hold them accountable. also we can learn from that. so in the future if we have diplomats abroad we can insure we're protecting them. as it relates to other countries,
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 12:00pm EST
obvious higher priorities, iran, the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia, and so forth. i would imagine considerably lower priority. >> did cuba policy wax and wean with each new administration? >> it did. it did. the most ferocious opposition was in the kennedy years. jack kennedy, as i said, was really determined to do something about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. hue millñhr -- huh mill -- humiliated by castro in the bay of pigs. kennedy's obsession was vietnam so cuba declined precipitously. presidents like ford, carter, made very serious efforts to achieve that with fidel castro, the opposite of what kennedy was doing, and so, yes, cuba maxed and waned. a different kind of priority over the 50 years for 10 or 11 american presidents. >> on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets? did cuba have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president? >> i don't think castro ever had a direct hand in an assassination plot against an american president, but i describe in the book some of the most startling information i acquired
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
everyday, whether it be syria, iran, pakistan, considering -- into network and afghanistan, the fault lines in the middle east. weatherby out in the pacific with the rise of china. look at what's going on with the items within the pacific, korea, 29 euros leader in charge of korea, what is he going to do in the future. we have narcoterrorism, we have transnational narcoterrorism. what does that mean for the future and so could ever country? i don't know. but these are questions we have to take a look at. these are questions that we have to be prepared to operating. the other thing i have learned come a frankly the hard way, over the last several years as my time in a back is that you also have what i call opportunists who will try to take advantage of instability and de- stabilizing influence, and mason governments are facing government. and these opportunists are may be unpredictable. and i was use iraq as an example. there were lots of opportunists and iraq. iran, turkey, saudi arabia, kuwait, nonstate actors all opportunists trying to get finish of a situation or how to set project
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 7:00am EST
sectarianism now coming out of syria and bahrain. saw a survey showing there's higher numbers of egyptians who say shia shouldn't be considered real muslims than there are in iraq, and iraq just went through a sectarian civil war, and most egyptians have probably never seen a shia in their life. so sectarianism, those kinds of things, are also being spread through, through these media channels. >> yeah. i think on, you know, the unification issue, um, i agree that there's diversity, and you will find, you know, libya, tunisia, everywhere else will be focused on issues. only about a third across the board identify with this state as the first choice of identity. and most still identify themselves either muslim or arab first. really it's muslim arab. so you've got, in essence, you know, when you even ask them should the state serve the interests of its citizens or the interest of arabs or muslims, you have a large chunk saying the interest of arabs and muslims, so there is a sense of connectedness even as they focus on the issue. but politically, we're focused on public opinion, th
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2012 12:00pm EST
situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings that are going to be taking
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 10:00pm EST
american enjoy and syria? what obligation to the french nation? it destroys our understanding of the term and weakens us as a citizen. since then according to greatest access of prosperity but history have been in decline this is inevitable and nothing lasts forever. one may be a healthy age to find the straight to reasonably consider the options this is designed to make a moral choice between two flawed and alternatives. if we do not have that choice to weaken the power of the american electorate. it is our country to enjoy as long as we choose. thank you. [applause] >> i think that i talked to long. >> we have a few questions. please wait for the microphone. we will start here. >> thank you very much for the thoughtful address. talk about hollywood culture , it is political to some degree. in the 53 had reagan and hollywood to do rehab robert redford, barbara streisand. what is the dynamic? are there any other signs in your career that it might be redirected? >> if you look at the people trying to save the world the phrase then hollywood was the soul so dead so those are saying the over
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 5:00pm EST
defense issues. the summit addressed cybersecurity and modern warfare, syria and china and republican senator john mccain and democratic senator mark udall led the delegation. this panel takes a broad look at the global perception of american power and leadership in the world as well as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "t
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 6:45pm EST
testified against some of the favors an favor of it said okay these are the countries, sudan, syria, iran. that's where we want the united states to be so you try to injure someone in ten seconds and you have to go to the web site and do this and that. so yes it is difficult on that score but as far as the answer to your question i don't think if you organize the general opposition but if you can wait for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this r
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
tracked 500 al-qaeda suicide bombers or terrorists who had filtered into iraq through syria, and the possession of this data base of 5 # 00 individuals who were recruitedded to blow themselves up or arrange for terrorist attacks was critical in the effort to take al-qaeda apart inside of iraq, and i'll read you what i wrote here in the prologue. the motherload of documents seized in what has become known as the sinjar raid illustrated the point nicely. the point made by lieutenant general flynn. in the six years after the 9/11 attacks, the u.s. military and intelligence communities representing a wide variety of agencies, large and small, those notorious and those secret, had been collaborating on an unprecedented capability for crushing terrorist networks. in addition to the skills of the talented special operators, the effort used super computers and custom software, forward deployment of skilled analysts, the ability to turn just about every kind of intel into searchable data whether tips or documents from old-fashioned human spy networks, transcripts of detainees in interrogation
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